President U. S. Grant

For as long as I can remember I’ve always had a thing for U.S. Grant. I don’t know where my interest came from. I can’t pinpoint it to a certain time or day. I think it has something to do with the odds he overcame to not only become one of the greatest civil war generals during that rebellion but also President of the United States from 1868-1876. If you go to my Apartment Tour there is another Grant item there. I bought it 30 years ago (?) and it’s above a mission bookcase in one of the last photos of the Apartment Tour. It’s made out of copper, has Grant in the middle and highlights from his life around the sides.

This is the only other photo I have of myself from my New York Trip. I'm in front of Grant's Tomb.

This is one of two photos I have of myself from my New York Trip. I’m in front of Grant’s Tomb.

Grant's Tomb was opened in 1897. The last time I went to New York -- this is the landmark I wanted to see.

Grant’s Tomb opened in 1897. The last time I went to New York — this is the landmark I wanted to see. The architect of Grant’s Tomb was John Henenway Duncan.

A souvenir of the day.

A souvenir of the day.

Grant. Grant. Grant. Victorian die cuts. One is dated 1869.

Grant. Grant. Grant. Victorian die cuts. One is dated 1869.

U.S. Grant. After he exited the presidency, Grant, his wife, Julia, and their entourage traveled around the world for two years. This graphic recounts his many stops.

U.S. Grant. After he exited the White House, Grant and his wife, Julia, along with their entourage traveled around the world for two years. This graphic recounts their many stops.

This is a young Grant. Up until the time he was forty he was a complete and total failure. He couldn’t feed his family and was reduced to collecting wood and selling it. Whenever I feel like a failure, and it happens more and more as the years go by, I remember U. S. Grant and remind myself that I still have time.

This is Grant after his death. The “remember me” is the clue. Up until the time he was forty Grant was a complete and total failure. He couldn’t feed his family and was reduced to collecting wood and selling it. Whenever I feel like a failure, and it happens more and more as the years go by, I remember U. S. Grant and remind myself that I still have time.

This is a young image of Grant when he was a Lt. General.

This is a young image of Grant when he was a Lt. General.

This is Grant's house in Galena, Illinois. The townspeople gave it to him. I've been there three times.

This is Grant’s house in Galena, Illinois. The townspeople gave it to him. I’ve been there three times.       

An old Vanity Fair image. Grant was still president in 1875 so he does symbolize the United States.

An old Vanity Fair image. Grant was still president in 1875 so he does symbolize the United States.

It's a paperweight with an image of Grant's Tomb.

It’s a paperweight with an image of Grant’s Tomb.

I guess it would be a milk pitcher but I can't believe anyone would use it for that purpose. It's a souvenir.

I guess it would be a milk pitcher but I can’t believe anyone would use it for that purpose. It’s a souvenir.

The name of the book is: The Heroic Life of General U.S. Grant: General of the Armies of the United States. It's from 1902 and has some very colorful lithograph illustrations inside.

The name of the book is: The Heroic Life of General U.S. Grant: General of the Armies of the United States. It’s from 1902 and published by DeWolfe, Fiske and Co. of Boston, Mass. It also has some very colorful lithograph illustrations inside.

When I was in Illinois I came upon this sign. When I showed this photograph to a co-worker he said,

When I was in Illinois I came upon this sign. When I showed this photograph to a co-worker he said, “I’m surprised you didn’t unscrew it from the pole.” I never thought of that!

An early image of Grant.

An early image of Grant. If you click on this image once he kind of looks like the Wolfman BUT if you click on it a second time you can see, in close up, why he looks like the wolf man.

It's one of those fold out post card things. It has pictures of all the points of interest in Galena.

It’s one of those fold out post card things. It has pictures of all the points of interest in Galena.

The gold colored one commemorates the opening of Grant's tomb. The other one is a political item.

The gold colored one commemorates the opening of Grant’s tomb. The other one is a political item.

The backs of them.

The backs of them.

Some Grant spoons. The one on the left is a good likeness. The one on the left is not a good likeness. The one on the left makes him look like Homer Simpson.

Some Grant spoons. The one on the left is a good likeness. The one on the right not so much. The one on the right makes him look like Homer Simpson.

This is Grant's home outside of St. Louis. It's called White Haven.

This is Grant’s home outside of St. Louis. It’s called White Haven. I went there a couple of summers ago. I like his home in Galena better. The Galena home is more Victorian and everybody knows that means “over the top.” White Haven is pine floors, empty space and an occasional piece of furniture. FYI: Somebody needs to tell the NATIONAL PARK SERVICE that the house is green. What’s up with that? Shouldn’t it be called Green Haven?

This card was part of the Heroes of History Series and came fee with Pan Handle Scrap. Scrap was tobacco chew.

This card was part of the “Heroes of History Series” and came free with a package of Pan Handle Scrap. “Scrap” was tobacco chew.

The 19th century magazine Punch commented on world events. This appears to be from the year of Grant's death.

The 19th century magazine Punch commented on world events. This appears to be from the year of Grant’s death. I actually took pictures of these Punch images because they were too big for the 11 by 17 scanner I use. 

Another Punch image. They were in the center of magazines. This accounts for the small holes.

Another Punch image. They were in the center of the magazine. This accounts for the small holes.

This one has a bit of damage. Too much glue(?) in the gutter? Regardless, I bought it because it'll be a long time before I find another one.

This one has a bit of damage. Too much glue(?) in the gutter? Regardless, I bought it because it’ll be a long time before I find another one.

This is my favorite one because it has Grant and Garfield.

This is my favorite one because it has Grant and Garfield.

Yes, it's a doll but it's made by HASBRO who makes G.I. Joe so it's not really a doll. I posed him on my desk at work. Normally, he stands in my bookcase.

Yes, it’s a doll but it’s made by HASBRO who makes G.I. Joe so it’s not really a doll — it’s a MAN TOY. I posed him on my desk at work. Normally, he stands in my bookcase behind me.

I have a book coming out on December 16, 2013. It's called The Odd Fellows.

My book was released on December 16, 2013. It’s called The Odd Fellows.

Published in: on February 16, 2013 at 11:09 pm  Comments (2)  

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Thank you for a nice website. I share your admiration for this man. In California, I preside as the judge over a veterans court. I often refer to the life of U. S. Grant as a positive example. Mark Johnson

  2. Thanks Mark. It’s always great to find someone else whose is interested in presidential history.


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